At Some Point, Waje Turned to Alcohol to Deal with Her Issues…

Posted on Jun 6 2016 - 8:18am by Editor

13277807_278385602511273_1748411534_n (1)


Waje has spoken to Genevieve Magazine about a number of issues ranging from the effect of eight loss criticism on her. She said at a time when people criticized her, for her size, she turned to alcohol:

That was after my performance at the Guinness Colourful world event in October 2013.  I trended on twitter but not for the right reasons. I did not trend because of my performance, instead I trended because people were uncomfortable with my body size. They had an opinion about how I looked. The things people were comparing me to were hideous. Someone took a picture of a remote control and said I looked like that. That made me say to myself, ‘you know what Waje, music isn’t for you’. I had come out with an album, but when that happened, I said you know what, I can’t deal with this. I cried for hours that day at Eko Hotel. And interestingly, I started feeling the way they said I looked. So, I started drinking. I became bitter. I told myself I’m done with music. I’m going to find something else to do. I didn’t eat for days. I became angry with every family member who came to talk to me. I had no reasons to smile or be happy and decided to sign out of all my social media accounts.

On how she bounced back from that low period:

I started working with Uzikwendu of Uzi’s Burnout. And Uzi did not just work on my body, he worked on my mind, also. Through that, I separated myself from the negativity and focused on what I wanted to hear. I started to create an environment where the only thing I heard about myself is positive and great. So if you are my friend and you don’t compliment me, I’ll never call you. I edited my friendship. I then became more outspoken because initially I used to implode. I started telling it as it is. If I don’t like it, I say it. I had to tell myself, you are over thirty, if you don’t start telling people how you feel about their behavior, when will you start? That change made some people uncomfortable but that was the only way I could deal with it. You know, I used to think that my biggest fear in the world was failure, but I got to find out that my biggest fear was validation. As an artiste I wanted so much to be accepted. But now, I don’t care. Someone can say I do not like your song and I’ll say thank you; because my brand is not just about putting out good music but selling aspiration to women as well. But it gets difficult sometimes when people tell me that I am not a typical Nigerian woman because I am a single mother. So there are certain things I shouldn’t talk about, because I don’t have authority to talk about it. Even in the corporate world there are some jobs I can’t get because I am not married.

She also added that she doesn’t introduce any of her boyfriends, to her daughter

One, you can never come to my house and two, I’ll never introduce you to my daughter because you don’t want to bring up a child in an environment where she thinks that it is okay to have men come in and go out of your life.

So it’s a rule. I don’t care how close you are to me; you can’t come to my house.

After her father, since I started dating, my daughter has only seen one person and after that person she’s never met another person again.

But I try and give her a father figure. So I create role models around her. I’ll have her go and spend time with my pastor’s family so she can have a family orientation.

About the Author

Leave A Response